Importance of measuring your weight with chronic illness!

 

Our shells are a huge part of how we get along within this world. With chronic illness one of the many limiting factors of our shell is the constant restraint of fighting our weight, either by gain or by loss. Depending on your chronic illness you may have an illness that prohibits or emphasizes the ability to lose or gain weight, you may have the limitations of exercise or food, you may require certain medications that effect your weight, or there are several other reasons that can occur where weight becomes a prime influence on your health or is affected by your health.

 

Weight becomes a constant back of the mind stress that pulls itself to the front at the worst times. Typically if you have a chronic illness you are affected in one way or another by weight and in turns, it plays a role on other health issues, your personal life, and how you walk through the journey of chronic illness. Although we shouldn’t’ be in a constant battle with ourselves, allowing negative thoughts and debilitating restrictions on ourselves based on the simple idea of weight, it is so important with chronic illness that we track it. We need to be able to see the potential ramifications weight may have o our chronic illness and feel that we have an understanding of it to the point that it is not overwhelming. This article is about giving you free tools to track your weight, along with key things to consider while tracking and speaking to a healthcare provider about your health.

 

Free tools for measuring:

Below are a few free tools that will help you keep track of your weight that your personal measurements. These tools can be taken to your health care provider to be a resource for your health journey.

weight goal chart : If you are currently trying to lose weight or finding yourself looking weight this helps with tracking the pounds lost. If losing weight is your goal, it can also be used as a fun chart to be motivation for losing weight! You can track your goals, what you will achieve, when you’ll get out the obese or overweight stage, etc.

Measurements : A measuring sheet is to measure different areas of your body to see if there are any shifts in inches. This is a great chart if you are trying to lose inches, but it can also be used as a great tool if you are finding that you are having certain health issues of swelling, or bloating, or etc.

Weight Chart : This chart is for tracking your weight. If you are finding you are having weight issues, or again want to lose weight this can be a great tool to keep track of your personal weight and if you are finding yourself gaining or losing weight and notes alongside each entry.

 

Tips for Weighing and Measuring:

 

Weight:

Weigh once a week. If you are finding that you are seeing significant changes, weigh every day or potentially morning and night. Speak to a health care provider if you are seeing unhealthy shifts in your weight.

Weigh with no clothes. Clothes can be heavy and very different from one another so try to weight without your clothes.

Weigh on the same scale. Unfortunately, all scales are not alike with slight differences, keeping to one scale with make the numbers more accurate and easier to track. Depending on your situation making sure the tracked weights are the most accurate can be very important.

Weigh at similar times each day. Try to wake up and weigh before you intake any liquids or food. Consuming any amount of fluids or solids can affect your weight and if you are trying to find the most accurate weight for your health you want to not add any weight.

 

Measurements:

Measure your inches once a month. Depending on what your health care provider is looking for, measuring certain parts of your body might require you to do it more frequently. If you are swelling or bloating, they may want you to track the measurements morning and night. Speak with a healthcare provider if you are seeing significant changes in certain areas of your body. If you are just wanting to have an awareness of your body’s measurements or trying to lose weight once a month is a great timeline to have for checking in with yourself.

Measure without clothes. Clothes add inches and can affect your numbers, so unless you are wearing skintight clothes, take them off to make sure you get the best measurement!

Measure in the morning. Morning is a great time to measure because it is before you consume anything and a more regular number. No matter when you measure, make sure you are consistent with the time of day you measure. This way you will have a more accurate perspective of where you are.

 

Important things to remember:

If you are finding that weight is an issue in one way or another, consider the following and check in with your healthcare provider to make sure they are aware of you are feeling. With filling out the free tools provided by your health care provider or by this article your health care providers may want you to track it in a specific way. Some things to consider if you are considering when tracking your weight;

Medicine can alter your weight. Depending on the type of medication and what your health issues are, medicine can have an effect where it can create a tendency for you to gain weight and have a difficult time losing it or visa versa.

Chronic illness itself can affect weight. Depending on what chronic illness you have, it may directly affect if you gain weight easily and it is more difficult to lose, or if you can’t gain weight, etc. Speak with your health care provider if there are tendencies to your specific chronic illness and if they may have any suggestions.

Know what healthy looked like. Knowing your current BMI is important to know if you are in a healthy range, overweight or obese. It allows for you to have a base. If you are currently not in the healthy weight range, consider when you were and what you were doing versus the current situation. This may help you and your health care provider to recognize the differences to see if there is anything that you could replace with the originals to fit with your chronic illness.

Know where you stand. Understanding if you are in a place that is typical or if it is a significant difference is huge. Tracking your weight, even if it isn’t for anything, in particular, will help you notice when there is a shift that needs to be considered.

Weight changes can lead to discovery. Depending on what you have going on and how either your measurements or weight are changing it can help healthcare providers understand what may potentially be happening to your body!

 

Questions:

How do you feel you are affected by weight alone in the journey of chronic illness?

 

To see my personal notes about weight issues in my life, check out my Instagram!

T r u l y ,   L i n d y

The Right Questions to Ask Your Doctor

 

The very short period of time we see a health care provider can seem overwhelming, especially since we live with chronic illness every day. To make the most of each office visit it is important to be prepared and know exactly what you would like to get out of each visit. Most office visit last from a half an hour to an hour, so figuring out exactly the right questions to ask your health care provider prior to the appointment can help tremendously. Below are examples of questions to ask that will help to get the right conversation going between you and your health care provider.

On the Nuanced Living Shop, there is a packet to help you when coming up with questions for your office visit! (It also comes in large font!)

 

How can you prepare to ask the right questions from your health care provider?

– Each visit is about informing the health care provider about the issues you are having and giving an update on your health. This usual rhythm is; telling the health care provider what is going on, asking questions, then creating the next steps with your health care provider.

– Inform the health care provider about your symptoms, along with what you have tried that works and doesn’t work.

– When going in to see a care provider, there might be a layer of people you could potentially see before you see the main health care provider. The questions that you have should be asked directly to the person you intended to see.

– Ask your caregiver if there are any questions you may not have thought about, along with coming up with a plan with them about who will ask the questions in the actual appointment.

– How many questions should you ask per visit? I’m a strong believer in asking all your questions. Write down the pieces you want to talk about in an order from the most important to least important. This way you will get to what you need the most. Within those topics, you will ask several questions. Don’t worry about having a limit, rather focus on getting the information you are paying for and that you need. Your health care journey is so important and your time can be limited with a health care provider, so figure out what is the most important to you and make sure you get all your questions answered.

– Make sure to write down all your questions you have, so when you get in the office you don’t forget anything you want to talk about. To make this task easier, look at the Question Packet on the Nuanced Living Shop. (Also in large font!)

 

 

What Questions to ask.

 

General questions:

– These are the symptoms I am having. Do you have any recommendations?

– Can you explain that test/medicine/medical term?

– Can you explain what about my anatomy is different or what my diagnosis is affecting?

 

Diagnosis Questions:

– What will the next few steps look like?

– How long do you think it will take to diagnose the problem?

– What does the path of _____ really look like if I am diagnosed with ______?

 

Treatment Questions:

– What are all the treatment options?

– What do you recommend the most out of all treatment options?

– Is there any side effects with the treatment(s) that I should be aware of?

– Will the treatments affect any other treatments I am currently doing or any other diagnosis I have?

– Is there anything I should change about my routine? Exercise or don’t exercise? Don’t eat a certain type of food? Not take a certain supplement?

– How long should I take the medicine to find out if it works or doesn’t work? Does the medicine require a process to come off of?

– Based on my insurance what are the treatments/surgeries that I can actually do? (Note: not all insurances will pay for different types of treatments or procedures. You can always ask the billing office for a rough estimate of how much it will cost if insurance won’t pay for it.)

– I don’t feel comfortable with that kind of treatment, are there other ways to treat it?

– How long do I have to make a decision about moving forward?

 

Test/Surgery/Procedure Questions:

– How many times have you done this procedure?

– When will I get the results?

– How will I get the results?

– What is the test/procedure/surgery for? What will we find from it?

– How is the test/procedure/surgery different here than other health care systems?

 

Communication Questions:

– When will we be in contact again?

– When should my next appointment be scheduled for?

– What is the best way to contact the health care provider if I have questions before my next appointment?

– Can I have a summary of the visit? If you want the health care provider to write down specific diagnosis or test, ask them to write it down in the office visit summary.

– Do you recommend any specific sources for finding extended information on my diagnosis?

 

 

To help create questions there is a Question Packet on the Nuanced Living Shop! (Also in large font!)

 

 

T r u l y ,   L i n d y